The Best Travel Books of 2017

Much is written about moving to Paris (and we admit we can’t get enough), but how about a slower pace of life in Provence? This light-hearted memoir follow a couple quitting their jobs to move to Provence and build a life there, from learning French, to making friends, and creating careers. The engaging style makes it one of the best travel books of 2017.

Find a wealth of fun, unique things to do in every state in the US with National Geographic’s fantastically curated new book. From lifelong writer, photographer and traveler Joe Yogerst, you’ll get the inside scoop and find something for everyone, no matter where you are.

Another contender for best travel book of 2017, Trespassing Across America is part travelogue, and part reflection on climate change, follow the writer as he undertakes a an ambitious hike along the entire path of the Keystone XL pipeline. He shares his journey first hitchhiking to the Alberta tar sands, then hiking the 1,700 miles to the pipeline’s endpoint in Texas.

Talk to anyone who’s been to Iran, and they’ll speak of the warmth of the people–ordinary people who are culturally miles away from, and frequently opposed to their “axis of evil” government. Author Lois Pryce embarks on a motorcycle trip across Iran to find just that: the ordinary and the beautiful in Iran and its people.

Part history of the Alps, part travelogue, author Stephen O’Shea tackles the subject with a humor and skill that fans of Bill Bryson will enjoy. The book delves into Alpine myths, legends, and history, from Napoleon to Nietzsche, William Tell to James Bond. He doesn’t stop at research, battling his fear of heights, and visiting towns throughout the Alps along his journey. Comparisons to Bryson abound when reviewing travel writing, but O’Shea really has crafted one of the best travel books of 2017.

Follow author Tim Moore on a punishing, ill advised 6,000 mile bicycle trip along the route of the old Iron Curtain in one of the best travel books of 2017. Full of humor, keen observations, and historical context, the book is as much about the kindness of strangers as it is adventure travel.

If you’ve ever been inspired by the travel bloggers who sold *almost* everything, and left to travel the world, this book is for you! The author guides you through creating a more minimalist focus in your life, and discusses how to travel frequently, and on the cheap. You don’t have to quit your job and sell everything, just live more frugally, and focus on what’s really important.

A love story, and beautiful recollection of moving to Jerusalem, and starting a family on Jerusalem’s Nablus Road. The story begins when the author falls for her soon to be husband at a Syrian monastery, at the time a French novice monk, and follows their life with wisdom and insight. 

Understanding more about Russia isn’t a bad idea, given how much they’re in the news nowadays, but in the hands of Journalist Lisa Dickey it’s a fascinating journey. She chronicles three trips to Russia over the course of three decades, portraying the lives of a wide range of Russian people and how they’ve evolved over time.

Doug Mack embarks on a exploration of the American territories that we often think of as so foreign. From American Samoa to the US Virgin Islands, he explores the history of how they came to be US territories, how they feel about it, and what they’re like today. Fascinating, and one of the best travel books of 2017.

Have you ever wondered if you have what it takes to hike the Appalachian Trail? Thought about going for it but didn’t know where to start? Whether you’re a serious hiker, musing about undertaking the hike, or just interested in the topic, this book is a must read. While it will answer your practical questions, it’s more than just lists, with anecdotes and info for anyone interested in backpacking.

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